Ex: Metric Conversions Using Unit Fractions – Volume / Capacity
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Welcome to three examples of converting volume using metric units. In a previous video, we used the table below to determine how many places to move the decimal point to the left or right in
order to perform conversions in the metric system. In this video, we’ll show
how to use unit fractions to perform conversions
in the metric system. Looking at the provided table, notice how the basic unit
of measure is the liter, but the smallest unit of measure would be the milliliter, which is equal to 1/1000 of a liter, and the largest unit
would be the kiloliter, which is equal to to 1,000 liters. So for our first example, we want to convert 75
milliliters to liters. So looking at the table, we want to convert milliliters to liters. Notice how one milliliter is equal to 1/1000 of a liter, so we’ll use this to
form our unit fraction. So we’ll write 75 milliliters as a fraction. That would be 75 milliliters over one. Now we’re going to multiply
it by a unit fraction to convert milliliters to liters. So in order for this to work, we want the milliliters to simplify out, so milliliters must be in the denominator, and liters must be in the numerator, and now we’ll use our conversion where we know that one milliliter is equal 0.001 liters. Notice how the units of milliliters simplifies out, so this product will convert 75 milliliters to liters. So we have 75 times 0.001. So we have 0.075 liters. Notice how we could have
just moved the decimal point to the left three times. Next we want to convert
0.25 kiloliters to liters. So going back to our table, notice that one kiloliter
is equal to 1,000 liters. So we’ll start with 0.25
kiloliters over one, and multiply it by our unit fraction where we must have
kiloliters in the denominator and liters in the numerator, and again, the conversion is one kiloliter equals 1,000 liters. Notice that kiloliters simplifies out, leaving us with liters. So we have 0.25 times 1,000. Notice how we could just
move the decimal point to the right three times to get 250. So we have 250 liters. Now for this last example, notice how liters is not
part of the conversion. We want to write 2.5 centiliters as deciliters. Again, we want to convert
centiliters to deciliters, and notice how we’re
going from smaller units to larger units, so the value should be smaller in deciliters. Also recognize that one centiliter is equal to 1/100 of a liter, and one deciliter is
equal to 1/10 of a liter. So we could perform two conversions here, but hopefully we can recognize that one deciliter would be 10 times as large as a centiliter, and therefore, one centiliter would be equal to 1/10 of a deciliter, or we could say it takes 10 centiliters to equal one deciliter. Let’s go ahead and perform
this conversion in one step. We have 0.25 centiliters over one. Multiply it by a unit fraction where we know centiliters
must be in the denominator, and we’ll have deciliters
in the numerator. We can use either conversion. Let’s go ahead and use this first one where we have one centiliter equals 1/10 of a deciliter. Notice how centiliters simplifies out, so this product will
give us our conversion. 0.25 times 1/10 will be the same as moving the decimal point
to the left one place, or 0.025. Okay, that’s going to do it
for these three examples. I hope you found this helpful.

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