Practical DIY Tiny House Overlander
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Hi I’m Koda and I’m Angela. This is Iggy
the house truck. We’ve been full time for two years in Iggy and three years on the
road. We’re on the great Tecolote beach just outside of La Paz Baja California
Sur. We’ve been on this beach for a little over a week now. It’s one of our
favorite spots down here. The water is great. Nice and shallow and warm not many
waves and there’s a bar at the end of it. I’ve always been kind of traveling with
either work or climbing, was a climber for a really long time so I’ve lived in a
lot of different vehicles and I’ve kind of always just been a little bit nomadic.
I was working up in Alaska in the summers and she was living in Bend
Oregon where we both lived. And I said, “I never want to spend another cold winter
again so we can move to California Florida or Hawaii.”
He chose Hawaii and then I started doing all the paperwork for it and looking for
jobs and two months later he called me and said, “I think we should just buy a
van and drive to Baja” and so that’s what we did and we’ve been on the road
full-time since then. Basically we afford this lifestyle by working about ten weeks a
year in Alaska in the fishing industry. That affords us to travel the rest of
the time. This is Iggy the house truck. He is a 2001 F-350 with a 7.3 liter diesel
engine, four-wheel drive dually. I originally paid $8,000 for the truck
before the build-out. The build-out was originally budgeted at $18,000 so that’s
kind of where we quit counting. If we had to really do an actual estimation of it
I would say we were probably about 24 to 25 thousand dollars into it over the
span of two and a half – three years. Iggy started his life as a work truck
up on the North Slope of Alaska. They use the Gruman Olson refrigerator box up
there because you can heat it. It has an inch and a half of spray foam all the
way around it. I welded up all the racks, all the roof rack, did the bumper, you
know, everything that makes it pretty. Iron Cross bumper. 13,000 pound winch
which is just barely enough for this guy. We got solar panels on the cab over and
I got two more up top for a total of 450 watts of solar. You can power two six
volt golf cart batteries with it. It’s 400 amp hours. Cut the door in. The stairs I don’t remember where we got these guys, Amazon I’m sure. These are a
game-changer here versus the ladder that a lot of the other Overlander big rigs
use. Got the boxes all around for your extra storage. The ARB Touring awning. It’s
the six-foot one so I think it’s like 150 or the 1500, they use millimeters, that’s
key. Definitely a game-changer there. You can have it out in any wind storm that
we’ve encountered so far and no damage. This is our water fill. We fill two tanks
on the inside. I have two 15 gallon tanks one on each side and if you include my
hot water and our other storage capacity we have about 33 gallons of water on
board when we’re full. If we’re down here and we’re thrifty, we can stretch it to you know
week and half – two weeks. If we have easy access to water we can run through it a
lot quicker. Come around the back here. We run a propane heater and
propane stove inside. This is pretty much the simplest system we can come up with.
It’s just bolted to the bumper but it makes it easy to fill this guy up and
take it in and out. Very important is our RV Map of the places we’ve been and the
places we haven’t I guess is even more important. This is my bike rack here that
I made and I have the one up bicycle racks on there. Super easy, just slap your
bike in and out of these guys, put it up there, close it up, done. Works great for
fat tire bikes. So we have Rad Rover power bikes. They’re pretty new to us.
They have about 60 miles on them but they’re big fat tired electric bikes, 20
miles an hour top speed. Super fun, really cool riding around towns down here in
Mexico. Open this guy up here and you can access the garage here. In the garage is
where all of our water is. This is where our batteries are. Most importantly tool
storage because down here you tend to break a lot of stuff. Just living this life you
tend to break a lot of stuff and fishing poles and spear fishing gear also pretty
key down here. A ton of room in there for me, ton of storage. Angela always
tries to put stuff down there, but I try to keep it on the minimum.
for sure. We’ve got max tracks super key. This is our hot water shower setup here.
Water comes out right here on the pressure side of our pump and so I’ve
got cold here, I’ve got hot here. It goes up and it goes through a copper coil
that’s inside of a black box with a Plexiglas lid and you basically just
have a hot water outdoor shower. Hot water outdoors or any water outdoors is
really nice on a rig like this where you got the saltwater, you come in you can
rinse off your fishing poles, rinse off your feet,
rinse off all your gear and take a quick shower. It actually gets too hot. That’s
why you have a little mixing valve here. And then I’ve got a dump here
so I can dump it all when we go back up north to the frigid freezing conditions.
This guy is pretty cool. This is a vent that goes up and in and there’s an
inline fan in it. It’s a bilge fan for a sailboat and if
it’s raining outside or if we’re somewhere where we don’t want to leave
the windows open per se I can run that guy and it takes the air from the
coolest spot, which is underneath the truck, and blows it in. So I can have the
fan running without the windows open but I still have air flow running through
this guy so that’s pretty, that’s definitely one of the lessons that we’ve
learned in all this is like you have to have your airflow and you have to get it
from the right spots. You don’t want it through your sunny windows. You want to
be able to close those up and still have good flow coming around. I cut this
window in here. It’s always scary cutting holes into your house truck, but
that window was given to us so it was super cool because I’m really cheap and
probably would have bought something a lot cheaper than that guy. This is
actually our gray water storage right here. The water comes straight down from
the sink right into this guy and I can pull it out and dump it and then this is
10 extra gallons of diesel fuel. It’s pretty handy to have down here. Diesel’s
a little bit harder to find. Also driving through Canada it can save your ass. Hello, welcome to the inside of our house truck. So we have 96 square feet in here so the
dimensions here are 8 feet across 12 feet long 8 feet tall so tons of
headroom which allows for a lot of storage. I actually use a step stool to
reach the ceiling, fantastic fan I can barely reach it. This is a door that Koda
built. It was one of our bigger challenges. It’s actually the second door.
The first one had a metal skin on the outside. It would warp with the heat so
it didn’t shut very well so this is second version. Nice porthole window, it’s
kind of fun. High-top table with an IKEA chair, it
folds up. We can easily sit three people here if you’re not huge. This lifts up. We
keep laundry in here, we call it the office. There’s a little shelf in here
that we keep paper work on. I love having a fixed bed it’s been really key to
traveling and being able to not have to make a bed every day. This is a kind of a
hiding cupboard. Koda calls it the ‘chip cover’ because chips take up so much
space. These awesome blankets here from Our Open Road,
two of my greatest inspirations for the van life. They’ve been traveling for a
long time doing this. Back up here, the bed, we have a couple of extra feet
on each side because we have the headboard here and at the end we have a
bookshelf down here and then mostly just room for the cat to play around. We keep
this up here because he seems to like it. I never meant to keep it out all the time, but he sleeps in
here. We have a big-screen TV, super fun. We lay in bed and watch Netflix
series all the time. We actually download programs to our phone while we
have good service or Wi-Fi and then we have an HDMI cable that plugs right
into it and this is our fan I think Koda showed you from the outside. So that blows
across the across the bed and we can turn it it on right here. There’s a switch under
here. It’s a little bit loud but worth it yeah.
And we have an inverter here which I use to make bullet proof coffees in the morning,
mostly, and to plug in the TV. That’s all we use it for. Tons of storage underneath
the bed. We use big rubber totes for all of our clothes so the top is all clothes,
some toiletries. Underneath we have shoes and gear and one is usually for full of
all the canned salmon that we bring back from Alaska. Berkey water filter on the counter. The cupboards are the only thing I think in
here that Koda didn’t build. Home Depot cupboards, they’ve held up. I was a little
scared at first you know getting the latching system to keep things stable. We use gear ties for a lot of things while we’re rolling down the road,
that’s been really key. Over here we have the truck fridge, it’s a 12-volt fridge. I
like it because it’s you know vertical versus the Dometic slide-out coolers. I
find this so much more convenient and we have a small freezer in here. It also
runs on 110 if we’re plugged into shore power. Marine pump, running water. It’s a
little loud. I mean, you know, but we didn’t not like,
it doesn’t really matter. We don’t have hot water hooked up. Let’s see, I grew
some grass for my kitty cat because we’re in the desert and he likes grass.
It’s a propane stove. Don’t have a switch so we use the spark lighter, super easy.
Two burner *boom*. From Home Depot we got these super handy shades.
They work good. This is our new solar controller. We had a Windy Nation up
until two days ago. It died so we had to go into La Paz and this was the only
one that was available. Here we have a little bit more storage. Koda was really
excited about building this spot to keep extra beer that doesn’t fit in the fridge so
it kind of slides through. One of the really best features, was crucial to us,
was to cut a hole so we have a pass-through into the cab for the cat
and for safety, you know. We can both squeeze through there if we had to so I
love having that and for the best feature is actually when we’re rolling
down the road and things start rattling back here we can just close it and
it’s like peace and quiet. We don’t worry about it, we can’t hear it. This was
actually built specifically for a litter box because we had a cat when we built the box
so the litter is tucked away in there. This is our propane stove. It’s a Wave
Three I think. We’ve only used it three or four times, works great. We
decided use milk crates because we had them so we built the boxes around the milk
crates. Seasonal work or find a way to work
remotely I think is kind of key because you just can’t save up enough money to
sustain it. I mean I guess some people can and some people do. You know
these people who’ve lived in their rigs for four or five years you know with
kids and they don’t work, but they come from a different background than we
do. But yeah I think either seasonal work and getting on a seasonal circuit which
there’s a ton of. No matter your skill set. You can always find seasonal work. For me it was I kept moving from place to place for work and when I
finally decided like I want to go somewhere because I want to live there
then I was able to make it happen. So I might not have known that I wanted to
work in fishing industry until I was like I really want to go to Alaska this
year and I got into it. Figuring out you know what you want, where you want to be,
and then hopefully going from there. The reason I live my life the way I do
is cause like ‘live intentionally’. You know it doesn’t matter what you do but don’t
just succumb to the circumstances around you because that’s where you grew up.
You know don’t take a job just because those are the only jobs available.
Intentional decisions I think is what gives me the freedom to feel
confident. The choices that you make, not the circumstances that happen to you.
It’s my kind of philosophy on life. Thanks for watching this week’s episode.
I hope you enjoyed it. If you did be sure to like, comment and subscribe. And thanks to
all the Patrons who support the channel it’s very much appreciated. And if you
want to hear more about our stories and our travels give us a follow @imfeelingadventurous on Instagram or on my blog imfeelingadventurous.com. Thanks. Peace!

100 thoughts on “Practical DIY Tiny House Overlander

  1. How do you drive a wide box like that on the super-skinny no shoulder highways of Baja? Must be terrifying passing other trucks, buses..

  2. Mom, my new boyfriend wants me to travel the world with him! That's nice dear, you are giving up your career? Yes Mother! he's a lot of fun and we will go on adventures! Well he must be rich! No momma, we are going to live in a refrigerator on the back of a truck and I have to shit in a bucket. But we are young, self-centered and are running from reality. Well I can't talk you out of it, so your family and responsibilities will be here when you grow up.

  3. Wait… you can work for just 10 WEEKS in the Alaskan fishing industry and take the rest of the year OFF?!

  4. 6.00 would be good idea to have those diesel cans in some locking compartment or at least chained and padlocked..

  5. Unlike many others… They have the dope Kitchen & Bed… And in btwn did i just see a tiny idol of Ganesh.

  6. For a second I forgot that this was Dylan’s channel and I got so excited thinking I just found his van on another channel featuring tiny homes. Then I realized this was his channel.

  7. Hey whats up you guys! Had a blast hanging out with you two & Greg & Jesse. Hope to see you down there again! Did I get your contact info? Cheers!

  8. Wow. Am honest traveler about the cost of the build and how they maintain. They work hard in Alaska to do this. No bullshit about being a photographer or "side jobs on the computer", all the while incurring debt but putting on a front. Honesty on these travel blogs goes a long way.

  9. I liked what he said about living with intention and not being afraid to live outside the box. Peace and good vibesss!

  10. So so many people are living for the day there will be a lot of people unable to ever retire. Truth is working doesn't have to be horrible. Just stay out of debt & balance work & play.

  11. A 7.3L 4X4 ?….ALASKA – MEXICO?…….IF YOU WERE DRIVING A CONVERTED SHUTTLE BUS ID THINK YOUD STOLEN MY RETIREMENT GOAL..

  12. Where do you take a shit? You need a toilet and that’s important, especially early in the morning after drinking hot coffee when you guys get up. Get a plastic bucket.

  13. So uninformative if you don't already know all this! Naming stuff and pointing at it tells us nothing! I wouldn't be watching this is I knew all that already. Sad

  14. unless I forget and you do not mention… what is your miles per gallon???
    FINALLY,,, somebody who did a great job on building out the ass end, in AND exterior space to a much fuller potential/use. Not stealth, but functional… Now I gotta look up what those orange things are for. I am thinking if one gets stuck, to UNSTIK the vehicle? Why not choice of a 40 lb. propane tank? and maybe a 10/11 pound portable spare propane tank for a small heater or something else for portable use like small grill to go cook in the woods, LOL. BUY a good bow saw and hang it next to axe and hatchet… will be handy if camping and cutting firewood… I did not see one handy in the "garage":.
    One additional thing I wold do is a vent fan over the cook area…. I like salmon and I love bacon… and both smell a place up and grease floats wverywhere when making such and French toast too… Cut in a vent outlet, and maybe hinge the vent so vertical when not in use and to easily clean it when needed. GLAD to see a CAT for once in these videos…
    Thanks for bringing these vids Dylan.

  15. Just curious,,, how much did you pay for the 4 step used setup…. prob. came from a large 5th wheel which was scrapped.

  16. There's just something about these sorta messy DIY builds that makes them more interesting than those super bling Toyotas that you see on instagram.

  17. "Don't take a job just because that's the only job available…" The world he living in sound wonderful, but folks who need a job should definitely take any job that is available/offered to them. Even if it's temporarily taken until they can get the job they really want.

  18. id have to give it a no, not having a toilet to hammer one off in private sucks, must always be using gnarly public baths D:

  19. You need to come to maine i can show you some awesome places in maine in the summer and old orchard beach is beautiful deff come check us out feel free to look me up on facebook under the same name.. awesome rig enjoy all the time spent 🙂

  20. The 7.3L is an older engine so it’s fine on Mexican diesel, but the newer 6.7L engine is not able to run off Mexican fuel (or even European fuel).

  21. The choices that you make ! Well put.. Your truly self contained in life, and you take personal responsibility for everything you do. Great video.. "Happy Trails !!

  22. Would you be so kind as to elaborate on what you are actually doing 10 weeks out of the year to earn enough to support this life for 9 months. You said, fishing, salmon I think you said? Do you work on a boat, do you own a boat, are you fly fishing and selling the fish at a market somewhere? How does this work?

  23. I am looking for about your product place lave me a message . When I post this . I am looking for more information on this, I am looking for more information about the truck in your home you put on this how to make a truck would I have half for it I ain't got a f t a n Chevy truck how big of a house can I put on it for me to live with a dog please get back to you soon as possible I would appreciate it I'm looking for fine cuz I kind of figure out how I could build a tiny off living

  24. OK, so how do these guys convince these attractive women into living with them in a truck or a van? I've yet to see an ugly one.

  25. I liked them a lot…good vibes, great van. I just wish it was a bit bigger so you can have a dog there too and be able to hide bikes inside.

  26. dude, where is the shitter? where is the shower? are you wild animals? pooping on logs on the road side? you need at least a mexican shower? does it smell bad in your hooch? lol

  27. Love the video, really fresh and sooo nice not to listen to vlogmusic all the time, great music. Cool van

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