Reading a Metric Micrometer.mp4
100 Comments


The metric micrometer is used the same way, has the same parts and is handled the same as a standard micrometer. The major difference between the two is the scale is in metric. Since the threads are finer on a metric micrometer, they are able to measure more accurately than a standard one. A one hundredths millimeter micrometer is as accurate as a one thousandths of an inch standard micrometer. And, a one thousandths millimeter is as accurate as a one ten thousandths inch standard. The major parts of an outside micrometer are Before using a micrometer, make sure the ends of the measuring surfaces are clean and that the micrometer is properly calibrated. Use a piece of paper or cloth and clean the measuring faces thoroughly. Check the calibration of the micrometer by using the ratchet to close the measuring ends and checking to see if the zero line on the sleeve is lined up with the zero line on the thimble. Use a spanner wrench in the small hole in the sleeve and turn the sleeve until both zeros line up. The line on the sleeve is graduated in millimeters. Every fifth millimeter is numbered from zero to 25. Each millimeter is also divided in half. Turning the thimble in or out one full revolution moves it a half a millimeter and two complete revolutions will move it in or out one millimeter. The beveled edge on the thimble is graduated in 50 equal divisions and every fifth line is numbered. Each line on the thimble is one hundredth of a millimeter. To read the metric micrometer, first see how many millimeter lines are showing to the left of the beveled thimble edge. In this example, 15 millimeters is showing. Then, see if there are any five tenths millimeter lines between the beveled edge and the millimeters. In this example, there is one line, so 5 tenths of a millimeter must be added to 15 millimeters. The last step is to read the thimble. Look at the thimble and see what number lines up with or is just below the line on the sleeve. In this example, the 6 mark is lined up with the line on the sleeve, so 6 hundredths of a millimeter must be added. The total measurement is 15 and 56 hundredths of a millimeter. In this example, the 11 millimeter line is showing to the left of the beveled thimble edge. There are no 5 tenths millimeter lines between the 11 line and the beveled thimble. The 8 mark on the thimble is lined up with the line on the sleeve, so 8 hundredths of a millimeter must be added. The total measurement is 11 and 8 hundredths of a millimeter. In this example, the 9 millimeter line is showing to the left of the beveled thimble edge. There are no 5 tenths millimeter lines between the 9 line and the beveled thimble. The 12 mark on the thimble is lined up with the line on the sleeve, so 12 hundredths of a millimeter must be added. The total measurement is 9 and 12 hundredths of a millimeter. In this example, the 16-millimeter line is showing to the left of the beveled thimble edge. The 17 millimeter line is showing, but cannot be counted since the thimble has not come around to the zero line yet. There is a 5 tenths millimeter line between the 16 line and the beveled thimble edge, so 5 tenths of a millimeter must be added to 16 millimeters. The 37 mark on the thimble is lined up with the line on the sleeve, so 37 hundredths of a millimeter must be added. The total measurement is 16 and 87 hundredths of a millimeter.

100 thoughts on “Reading a Metric Micrometer.mp4

  1. Thank you for you video.It is a little awkward that the USA still complies with the English system.The whole rest of the world utilizes the metric system fortunately.

  2. Today our physics teacher tried to explai how to use this micrometer for about 20 minutes and i din't got it.now it took only 2 minutes to understand 😉 thanks

  3. Just saying, most of the time you will get a micrometer with the sleeve going a different way, it's the same way of measuring, just that it may be confusing to some people who have never used a micrometer before.

  4. this was way simple to understand than the indian version. don't know why they make it sound so complicated. (im indian)

  5. By zero I assume you are talking about the micrometer not actually being at zero when it is all the way in. A good point that I didn't include in this video, but did in my Reading a Standard Micrometer video. I adjust it before using the mic so I don't have to calculate anything.

  6. You can't count the 17mm line even though it is barely showing since the thimble has not come around to the zero yet. Start back at 3.39 and this will explain it.

  7. Very good video – explains how to use a micrometer quickly and clearly. Very useful for a-level exam practicals ecspecially when your teacher doesn't decide to explain how to use one.

  8. Thank you so much, I did not understand my physics teacher or the textbook at all but this has made it soo clear! Thankyou!!

  9. Thanks!

     
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  10. My second biggest watched video is Reading a Metric Micrometer with over 167, 000 views.  It can be viewed at Reading a Metric Micrometer.mp4

  11. Some people just cannot read a conventional micrometer.  I know because in the 1970s there was a bloke who needed a better job than digging the odd grave every now and then.  There was a vacancy in Acton London for a Machine Loader at Evershed & Vignoles.  The job entailed loading metal bars into a CNC lathe but one HAD to be able to read a micrometer!  After three nights of tuition at the pub he still couldn't do it!  Later the bloke had another attempt at getting a good job.  He thought that he could be a motor mechanic at Mercedes Brentford (the #1 branch in the UK).  When we asked him how he had got on he said that he had been caught out by a trick question "The foreman asked me how I would tune twin carburettors and I said that I would take them off and do them one at a time." 

  12. The last picture (example) should read 17.37mm and not 16.87mm. This is with the assumption that there is "no offset" from the beginning. I actually do not think that the "division mark is barely visible" as explained by motoprof1441. For a good working micrometer, you shouldn't be able to see the 17th division mark on the main scale at all. Therefore, the concept of "offset" must be taken into consideration for compensation based on the condition of the micrometer.

  13. Just curiouse…. Why do they call it a micrometer if the units are all in expresses in mm? Or is a milliometer taken by some other device?.

  14. Basic system SI is designed for meters, rarely you can meets him for the milimeters.
    Micron in scale of "1m" is 1/1 000 000 = 1micron (0.000001) (10 to the power -6)

    But micron in SCALE of "1mm" is 1000mm/1 000 000 = 1micron

    (Naming in the measurement laboratories)
    0.1 = 10 section of 1mm (10 to the power -1) (100 000/1 000 000)
    0.01 = 100 section of 1mm (10 to the power -2) (10 000/1 000 000) resolution of micrometer, elec.caliper.
    0.001 = 1000 section of 1mm (10 to the power -3) (1000/1 000 000) otherwise called as "micron" – resolutions of pasametr.
    0.0001 = 10 000 section of 1mm (10 to the power -4) (100/1 000 000)

    Remember that school does not teach everything! 😉

  15. Great video. Pictures and accompanying explanations are very effective, and an time-efficient way to teach. I got a lot out of this video.

  16. Thank God for your video Sir!
    I was having a hard time understanding the methods of reading the micrometer from the ppt presentations I searched then I decided to watch it here in YouTube.

  17. My teacher tried to explain this to me like 10 times in MY OWN LANGUAGE,and I couldn't understand. Now you explained it in English and I completely understand. Thank you so much

  18. Just to expend the explanation a little, at 2:40, the reading of "15 and 56 hundredths of a millimetre" consists of 16 whole millimetres, 5 tenths of a millimetre, and 6 one hundredths of a millimetre, and would be spoken or written down as 15.56 millimetres.

    At 3:03, because there are less than 10 hundredths of a millimetre, after the whole number, a zero is placed after the decimal point, making it 11.08 millimetres.

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